Kansas City Missouri Internet

If you live in or near Kansas City MO and are looking for looking for Internet online, then you probably searched for something like “Kansas City MO Internet” or “Internet services near Kansas City MO.” So now that you’ve found our website and several other Internet companies, how do you know which one offers the best Internet services in the Kansas City MO area?

Need Kansas City MO Internet Experts? Then you are in the right place!

But isn’t everyone going to claim they are Kansas City MO Internet experts? Of course! And that’s why we invite you to review our Kansas City MO Internet results. That’s also why we are happy to provide reviews for business in and near Kansas City MO.

Google Fiber Space
%business_name

86 reviews

Internet Service Providers, Mobile Phones, Television Service Providers
+18667777550
1814 Westport Rd, Kansas City, MO 64111
Verizon
%business_name

1 review

Mobile Phones, Electronics, Internet Service Providers
+19139820010
10621 Parallel Pkwy, Kansas City, KS 66111
Xfinity
%business_name

1 review

Television Service Providers, Internet Service Providers
+18167951100
15305 W 119th St, Olathe, KS 66062

Searches for Internet for Kansas City MO may include:

  • Internet services Kansas City MO
  • Local Internet Kansas City MO
  • Best Internet Kansas City MO
  • Internet company Kansas City MO

The Internet is the global system of interconnected computer networks that uses the Internet protocol suite (TCP/IP) to communicate between networks and devices. It is a network of networks that consists of private, public, academic, business, and government networks of local to global scope, linked by a broad array of electronic, wireless, and optical networking technologies. The Internet carries a vast range of information resources and services, such as the inter-linked hypertext documents and applications of the World Wide Web (WWW), electronic mail, telephony, and file sharing.

The origins of the Internet date back to the development of packet switching and research commissioned by the United States Department of Defense in the 1960s to enable time-sharing of computers. The primary precursor network, the ARPANET, initially served as a backbone for interconnection of regional academic and military networks in the 1970s. The funding of the National Science Foundation Network as a new backbone in the 1980s, as well as private funding for other commercial extensions, led to worldwide participation in the development of new networking technologies, and the merger of many networks. The linking of commercial networks and enterprises by the early 1990s marked the beginning of the transition to the modern Internet, and generated a sustained exponential growth as generations of institutional, personal, and mobile computers were connected to the network. Although the Internet was widely used by academia in the 1980s, commercialization incorporated its services and technologies into virtually every aspect of modern life.

Most traditional communication media, including telephony, radio, television, paper mail and newspapers are reshaped, redefined, or even bypassed by the Internet, giving birth to new services such as email, Internet telephony, Internet television, online music, digital newspapers, and video streaming websites. Newspaper, book, and other print publishing are adapting to website technology, or are reshaped into blogging, web feeds and online news aggregators. The Internet has enabled and accelerated new forms of personal interactions through instant messaging, Internet forums, and social networking. Online shopping has grown exponentially both for major retailers and small businesses and entrepreneurs, as it enables firms to extend their “brick and mortar” presence to serve a larger market or even sell goods and services entirely online. Business-to-business and financial services on the Internet affect supply chains across entire industries.

The Internet has no single centralized governance in either technological implementation or policies for access and usage; each constituent network sets its own policies. The overreaching definitions of the two principal name spaces in the Internet, the Internet Protocol address (IP address) space and the Domain Name System (DNS), are directed by a maintainer organization, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). The technical underpinning and standardization of the core protocols is an activity of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), a non-profit organization of loosely affiliated international participants that anyone may associate with by contributing technical expertise. In November 2006, the Internet was included on USA Today’s list of New Seven Wonders.

The Kansas City metropolitan area is a bi-state 14-county metropolitan area straddling the border between the U.S. states of Missouri and Kansas, anchored by Jackson County, Missouri, and Johnson County, Kansas. Its most-populous municipality is Kansas City, Missouri (KCMO). With a population of 2,487,053 (2018 estimate), it ranks as the second-largest metropolitan area in Missouri (after Greater St. Louis) and the largest metropolitan area in Kansas. Alongside KCMO, the area includes a number of other cities and suburbs, the largest being Overland Park, Kansas; Kansas City, Kansas; Olathe, Kansas; and Independence, Missouri; each over 100,000 in population. The Mid-America Regional Council (MARC) serves as the Council of Governments and the Metropolitan Planning Organization for the area.

Kansas City

News Reporter